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Wio LTE Cat M1/NB-IoT Tracker

Seeed’s Wio LTE CAT M1/NB-IoT is designed for Low-Power Wide-Area Network (LPWAN) with CAT M1(eMTC) and NB-IoT combo module. Besides, It has an ARM Cortex-M4 MCU and GNSS module.

It’s Arduino and Espruino(JavaScript) compatible development board helps to track nearly any moving thing on the planet and then upload that data wirelessly. By integrating Grove connector, the Wio LTE CAT M1/NB-IoT allows for flexible communication solutions with Grove systems.

Wio LTE CAT M1/NB-IoT is well suited for outdoor projects where the device can connect to the satellite navigation system and provide a real-time location of the item it is attached to.

Wio LTE CAT M1/NB-IoT support Espruino(JavaScript) engine so that anyone can build IoT project rapidly, especially while you can use lot of resource of JavaScript community.

Are you looking for the Twilio Developer Kit for T-Mobile Narrowband? Find the docs here

Version

Product Version Changes Released Date
Wio LTE Cat M1/NB-IoT v1.0 Initial May 26, 2018

Specifications

  • ARM Cortex-M4 microcontroller LTE CAT M1 and NB-IoT combo for global
  • GPS/GLONASS GNSS supported
  • Espruino(JavaScript) compatible
  • Arduino IDE compatible (partly)
  • 6 x Grove port on-board, support 180 Grove modules at most
  • Easy migration from Wio LTE CAT.1

Hardware Features

  • STM32F405RG,ARM Cortex-M4, CPU running up to 168MHZ
  • 1Mbytes Flash
  • 192+4KBytes RAM
  • System
    • Operating voltage: 3.3V
    • Low power: Sleep/Standby modes/Stop
    • CRC-32 generator
  • LTE Connectivity
    • LTE CAT M1 and NB-IoT, Cat M1 Half-duplex (375 kb/s DL and UL) Cat NB1 Half-duplex (27.2 kb/s DL, 62.5 UL)
    • Embed protocol: TCP/UDP/FTP/HTTP/HTTPS/FTPS/TLS/MQTT/CoAP
  • GNSS
    • GPS/GLONASS
    • 2.5m CEP(GPS), 4.0m CEP(GLONASS)
  • Peripheral
    • 1 x USB for power supply and DFU
    • JST 1.0 connector for battery
    • 3 Buttons: 1. for Reset 2. for User function 3. into upload mode
    • Nano SIM and TF card 2 in 1 socket
  • Grove
    • 2 x Digital Port
    • 2 x Analog Port
    • 1 x UART
    • 1 x I2C

Tip

Use Grove modules to expand your application. There are 6 Grove connects on board. If this is your first time to hear about Grove, please put had on Grove System for more details. In brief, Groves is hundreds of sensor that in standard style, which is consist of sensors, actuators, displays as well as communication.

Applications

  • Smart city
  • Smart meter
  • Smart energy
  • Smart agriculture
  • Smart retail
  • Smart supply chain
  • Smart transportation
  • Connected car
  • Connected building
  • Connected Health
  • Sports equipment
  • Pet tracking
  • Property security
  • Shared bicycle
  • Logistics transport positioning system
  • Others

Hardware Overview

Tip

If you want to use the on-board Grove connector, please use digitalWrite(B10, HIGH) to open 3V3_B. except D38 power on by default. Otherwise you can't provide power to Grove modules.

Getting Started

Install USB driver

  • Windows Users: Most versions of Windows won't automatically load the built-in driver for USB com ports. You'll have to download ST's USB driver:

    • Non-Windows XP Users download version 1.4.0 drivers. Unzip the file, run the executable, and then go to C:\Program Files (x86)\STMicroelectronics\Software\Virtual comport driver in Windows Explorer and double-click either dpinst_amd64.exe for 64 bit systems, or dpinst_x86.exe for 32 bit.

    • Windows XP Users download version 1.3.1 drivers. Unzip the file, run VCP_V1.3.1_Setup.exe, and then go to C:\Program Files\STMicroelectronics\Software\Virtual comport driver in Windows Explorer and double-click the executable.

  • Linux users to ensure that you have the correct permissions to connect as a normal user you'll need to copy the file 45-espruino.rules to /etc/udev/rules.d, reload rules with udevadm control --reload-rules, and ensure your user is in the plugdev group (you can check by typing groups). You add it by typing sudo adduser $USER plugdev and then logging out and back in. Arch Linux users need to add their user to uucp and lock groups instead.

  • Mac OS X and Chromebook Users: The board will just plug in and work, without drivers!

Change DFU driver

For windows users:

  • Step 1. Press and hold BOOT button and connect to computer you will see STM32 Device in DFU Mode at device manager as below.

  • Step 2. This says that you need to use zadig_xx.exe to change DFU driver from STTub30 to WinUSB as below. If we can't see any info on the Zadig, please click Options→ List All Devices, then select STM32 Virtual COM Ports.

  • Step 3. You will see the "STMicroelectronics Virtual COM Port" on device manager as below.

Play with Arduino

1. Software Configuration

  • Step 1. Install Arduino IDE, recommand IDE version upon 1.8.0.
  • Step 2. Follow How to Add Seeed boards to Arduino IDE to add Seeed STM32F4 Boards into arduino board manager.
  • Step 3. Download the WioLTE_Cat_NB1_Arduino_Library from Github.
  • Step 4. Refer How to install library to install library for Arduino.
  • Step 5. Before uploading the sketch, press and hold both BOOT0 and RST buttons, release the RST button than the BOOT0 button, in this way the board will go into STM BOOLARDER mode.
  • Step 6. Don't choose any Serial port to upload the sketch in tools label just click upload icon.

2. Play with On board RGB LED

  • Step 1. Select File→ Examples→WioLTE_Cat_NB1_Arduino_Library→Seeed_WS2812b sketch.
  • Step 2. Press and hold BOOT button at back side of the Wio LTE Cat NB1 and plug the USB to PC.
  • Step 3. We will see STM BOOTLARDER in device manager.
  • Step 4. Select Tools→Boards→Wio_Tracker_LTE.
  • Step 5. Keep COM Port blank.
  • Step 6. Select Sketch→Upload to upload the code to Wio_LTE.
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#include <Seeed_ws2812.h>
#include <ublox_sara_r4.h>

#define LEN_NUM 1

Ublox_sara_r4 ublox = Ublox_sara_r4();
WS2812 strip = WS2812(LEN_NUM, ublox.RGB_LED_PIN);

void setup() {
  // Set RGB LED power pin high
  ublox.enableRGBPower();
  strip.begin();
  strip.brightness = 20;
}

void loop() {  
  strip.RGBCycle(1000);   
  strip.rainbowCycle(20);
}
  • Step 7. Press RST, then you can see the on board RGB LED work.

3. Play with GNSS

  • Step 1. Plug the Nano SIM card into Nano SIM slot, near PCB board side.
  • Step 2. Select File→ Examples→WioLTE_Cat_NB1_Arduino_Library→GNNS→GNSS sketch.
  • Step 3. Press and hold BOOT button at back side of the Wio LTE Cat NB1 and plug the USB to PC.
  • Step 4. We will see STM BOOTLARDER in device manager.
  • Step 5. Select Tools→Boards→Wio_Tracker_LTE.
  • Step 6. Keep COM Port blank.
  • Step 7. Select Sketch→Upload to upload the code to Wio LTE Cat NB1.
  • Step 8. Press RST button to enable the COM port.
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#include <ublox_sara_r4_gnss.h>

UBLOX_SARA_R4_GNSS gnss = UBLOX_SARA_R4_GNSS();

void setup()  
{
  // Open GNSS module
  gnss.open_GNSS();
  delay(3000);
  Serial.println("_Start");
}

void loop() {
  gnss.dataFlowMode();
}
  • Step 9. Use COM monitor tools to print the serial message. Please do not use Arduino IDE COM monitor! That may cause the next time downloading fail, but reopen Arduino IDE can recover that issue.
  • Step 10. We will see lat, lon info printed on screen.
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$GNRMC,,V,,,,,,,,,,N*4D
$GNVTG,,,,,,,,,N*2E
$GNGGA,,,,,,0,00,99.99,,,,,,*56
$GNGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,99.99,99.99,99.99*2E
$GNGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,99.99,99.99,99.99*2E
$GPGSV,1,1,01,30,,,44*7B
$GLGSV,1,1,00*65
$GNGLL,,,,,,V,N*7A
$GNRMC,,V,,,,,,,,,,N*4D
$GNVTG,,,,,,,,,N*2E
$GNGGA,,,,,,0,00,99.99,,,,,,*56
$GNGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,99.99,99.99,99.99*2E
$GNGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,99.99,99.99,99.99*2E
$GPGSV,1,1,04,07,,,43,17,,,38,18,,,39,30,,,44*70
$GLGSV,1,1,00*65
$GNGLL,,,,,,V,N*7A
$GNRMC,,V,,,,,,,,,,N*4D
$GNVTG,,,,,,,,,N*2E
$GNGGA,,,,,,0,00,99.99,,,,,,*56
$GNGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,99.99,99.99,99.99*2E
$GNGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,99.99,99.99,99.99*2E
$GPGSV,2,1,06,07,,,44,09,,,41,17,,,40,18,,,41*79
$GPGSV,2,2,06,28,,,40,30,,,45*73
$GLGSV,1,1,00*65
$GNGLL,,,,,,V,N*7A

4. Play with SD Card

  • Step 1. Plug micro SD card to the SD card slot.
  • Step 2. Select File→ Examples→SD→CardInfo sketch.
  • Step 3. Press and hold BOOT button at back side of the Wio LTE Cat NB1 and plug the USB to PC.
  • Step 4. We will see STM BOOTLARDER in device manager.
  • Step 5. Select Tools→Boards→Wio Tracker LTE.
  • Step 6. Keep COM Port blank.
  • Step 7. Select Sketch→Upload to upload the code to Wio_LTE.
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// include the SD library:
#include <SD.h>

// set up variables using the SD utility library functions:
Sd2Card card;
SdVolume volume;
SdFile root;

// change this to match your SD shield or module;
// Arduino Ethernet shield: pin 4
// Adafruit SD shields and modules: pin 10
// Sparkfun SD shield: pin 8
const int chipSelect = 43;

void setup()
{

  Serial.print("\nInitializing SD card...");
  // On the Ethernet Shield, CS is pin 4. It's set as an output by default.
  // Note that even if it's not used as the CS pin, the hardware SS pin 
  // (10 on most Arduino boards, 53 on the Mega) must be left as an output 
  // or the SD library functions will not work. 
  pinMode(SS, OUTPUT);


  // we'll use the initialization code from the utility libraries
  // since we're just testing if the card is working!
  while (!card.init(SPI_HALF_SPEED, chipSelect)) {
    Serial.println("initialization failed. Things to check:");
    Serial.println("* is a card is inserted?");
    Serial.println("* Is your wiring correct?");
    Serial.println("* did you change the chipSelect pin to match your shield or module?");
  } 

  // print the type of card
  Serial.print("\nCard type: ");
  switch(card.type()) {
    case SD_CARD_TYPE_SD1:
      Serial.println("SD1");
      break;
    case SD_CARD_TYPE_SD2:
      Serial.println("SD2");
      break;
    case SD_CARD_TYPE_SDHC:
      Serial.println("SDHC");
      break;
    default:
      Serial.println("Unknown");
  }

  // Now we will try to open the 'volume'/'partition' - it should be FAT16 or FAT32
  if (!volume.init(card)) {
    Serial.println("Could not find FAT16/FAT32 partition.\nMake sure you've formatted the card");
    return;
  }


  // print the type and size of the first FAT-type volume
  uint32_t volumesize;
  Serial.print("\nVolume type is FAT");
  Serial.println(volume.fatType(), DEC);
  Serial.println();

  volumesize = volume.blocksPerCluster();    // clusters are collections of blocks
  volumesize *= volume.clusterCount();       // we'll have a lot of clusters
  volumesize *= 512;                            // SD card blocks are always 512 bytes
  Serial.print("Volume size (bytes): ");
  Serial.println(volumesize);
  Serial.print("Volume size (Kbytes): ");
  volumesize /= 1024;
  Serial.println(volumesize);
  Serial.print("Volume size (Mbytes): ");
  volumesize /= 1024;
  Serial.println(volumesize);


  Serial.println("\nFiles found on the card (name, date and size in bytes): ");
  root.openRoot(volume);

  // list all files in the card with date and size
  root.ls(LS_R | LS_DATE | LS_SIZE);
}


void loop(void) {

}
  • Step 8. Press RST button to enable the COM port.
  • Step 9.Use COM monitor tools to print the serial message. Please do not use Arduino IDE COM monitor! That may cause the next time downloading fail, but reopen Arduino IDE can recover that issue.
  • Step 10. Open serial monitor, we will see below info on screen.
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Initializing SD card...
Card type: SDHC

Volume type is FAT32

Volume size (bytes): 2689048576
Volume size (Kbytes): 2626024
Volume size (Mbytes): 2564

Files found on the card (name, date and size in bytes):

5. Play with Network RSSI

  • Step 1. Select File→ Examples→WioLTE_Cat_NB1_Arduino_Library→RSSI sketch.
  • Step 2. Press and hold BOOT button at back side of the Wio LTE Cat NB1 and plug the USB to PC.
  • Step 3. We will see STM BOOTLARDER in device manager.
  • Step 4. Select Tools→Boards→Wio_Tracker_LTE.
  • Step 5. Keep COM Port blank.
  • Step 6. Select Sketch→Upload to upload the code to Wio_LTE.
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#include <ublox_sara_r4.h>
#include <UART_Interface.h>

Ublox_sara_r4 ublox = Ublox_sara_r4();

void setup() {

  SerialDebug.println("Begin...");
  ublox.powerOn();
  while(false == ublox.Check_If_Power_On()){
    SerialDebug.println("Waitting for module to alvie...");
    delay(1000);
  }  
  SerialDebug.println("Power On O.K!");

  delay(100);
  check_with_cmd("AT+UGPIOC=23,10\r\n", "OK", CMD);
  check_with_cmd("AT+UGPIOC=16,2\r\n", "OK", CMD);
}

void loop() {
    int signal;
    if(ublox.getSignalStrength(&signal)) {
        SerialDebug.print("RSSI: ");
        SerialDebug.println(signal, DEC);
    } else {
        SerialDebug.print("Error");
    }

    delay(1000);

}
  • Step 7. Press RST, then you can see below info on screen.
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AT+CSQ

+CSQ: 99,99

OKRSSI: 99

AT+CSQ

+CSQ: 99,99

OKRSSI: 99

AT+CSQ

+CSQ: 99,99

OKRSSI: 99

AT+CSQ

+CSQ: 99,99

Play with Javascript

Thanks to G.Williams for providing Espruino the Javascript interpreter, so that we can prototype things with Javascript.

Update Firmware

  • Step 1: For the latest firmware, you can download from here. The firmware is named as espruino_xxx_Wio_LTE.bin.
  • Step 2: Install dfu-util, add dfu-util to PATH or Environment Variables, so that we can use it directlly in command line.
  • Step 3: Press and hold BOOT0 button before connect to computer, release after connect.
  • Step 4: The Wio LTE board will access DFU mode.
  • Step 5: In command line windows type dfu-util -d 0483:df11 -c 1 -i 0 -a 0 -s 0x08000000 -D xxx.bin. For windows, Please enter the full path of the bin file.

dfu-flash

1. Install Espruino web IDE

Espruino Web IDE

2. How to use Espruino Web IDE

  • Step 1: Connect the Wio LTE board to computer using a micro USB cable. On device manager you can see a new COM Port device, on MacOS it is STM32 Virtual ComPort, on windows it is STMicroelectronic Virtual COM Port.

  • Step 2: On the Web IDE click the left top icon, choose Espruino board in the select box.

  • Step 3: To learn more about the IDE, please click help and then tour as below.

3. How to load modules

In Espruino, Modules are pieces of pre-written code (libraries) that perform common tasks, such as interfacing to different bits of hardware.

They can currently be used in a few different ways:

3.1. Espruino Web IDE

If you're using the Espruino Web IDE, simply write require("modulename") on the right-hand side - as you would have seen in the reference pages. When you click the Send to Espruino button, the Web IDE will automatically look online for minified versions of the modules you need, download them, and load them onto the board. You don't need an SD card or an internet connection to the Espruino board itself.

3.2. Load Module - the default mechanism

If you are using the Web IDE as is, the modules will be loaded from http://www.espruino.com/modules/. This URL can be changed in Web IDE settings.

To save space, most modules are provided as a minified version and the Web IDE tries to load minified versions first with default configuration.

For example, using require("ADNS5050"); will make the Web IDE loading the minified module from http://www.espruino.com/modules/ADNS5050.min.js.

3.3. Load Module from Github

For now, as you can type a URL into require, you can actually just pull a module right off GitHub:

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require("https://github.com/espruino/EspruinoDocs/blob/master/devices/PCD8544.js");
You can even look at the history of something on GitHub, and can then require a specific version of that file with:
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require("https://github.com/espruino/EspruinoDocs/blob/d4996cb3179abe260c030ed02bcb0d2384db6bbd/devices/PCD8544.js");
The URL comes from clicking <> by the commit you were interested in.

3.4. Load Module from NPM

If you activate this option in Web IDE, you can load modules from the NPM repository. Right now it:

  • only loads the latest version there.
  • only works if the module contains a single file.
  • can cause some confusion with Espruino's modules, for instance clock.

For example using require("async"); will make the Web IDE loading the tar.gz file (with automatic extraction) of the module from http://registry.npmjs.org/async.

3.5. Load Module from local folder

If you are using a local project folder, the Web IDE will automatically create an empty modules folder inside. Put a module there and you can load it with require("myCustomModule");.

With default Web IDE configuration, it will look for modules following this order:

  • local minified
  • online minified
  • local normal
  • online normal

If your own module has the same name as one of the existing ones, the Web IDE will use the minified version from online first.

If you need it anyway, you can provide a local minified version or you can change the Web IDE configuration from .min.js|.js to .js|.min.js or even myCustomModule.js|.min.js|.js to get it working.

3.6. Stand-alone Espruino

If you have an Espruino with an SD card (but you're not using the Web IDE), you can copy the modules you need into a directory called 'node_modules' on the SD card. Now, whenever you write require("modulename") the module will be used.

3.7. Internet-enabled Espruino

Right now there isn't a way to make Espruino automatically load a module from the internet when required without the Web IDE. This may be added in the future, but the fact that require is synchronous while network connections are asynchronous makes this difficult to do reliably until yield is added into the interpreter.

Until then, the following asyncronous code will dynamically load a module from the internet on demand.

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function loadModule(moduleName, callback) {
  require("http").get("http://www.espruino.com/modules/"+moduleName+".js", function(res) {
    var contents = "";
    res.on('data', function(data) { contents += data; });
    res.on('close', function() {
      Modules.addCached(moduleName, contents);
      if (callback) callback();
    });
  }).on('error', function(e) {
    console.log("ERROR", e);
  });
}

4. Play with Onboard RGB LED

  • Step 1. Config the R, G, B numbers, the arrange is 0~255.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to IDE and upload to board.
  • Step 3. The on board RBG LED will be turned on.
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WioLTE.setLEDPower(true);
WioLTE.LED(r,g,b); // please modify the RGB to values with range 0..255)
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// Dynamic colors show
WioLTE.setLEDPower(true);

var rgb = new Uint8ClampedArray(3);
var pos = 0;
function getPattern() {
  pos++;
  for (var i=0;i<rgb.length;) {
    rgb[i++] = (1 + Math.sin((i+pos)*0.1324)) * 10;
    rgb[i++] = (1 + Math.sin((i+pos)*0.1654)) * 10;
    rgb[i++] = (1 + Math.sin((i+pos)*0.1)) * 10;
  }
  return rgb;
}
setInterval(function() {
  var color = getPattern();
  WioLTE.LED(color[0], color[1], color[2]);
}, 100);

5. Play with SD Card

Note

Epruino firmware v1.94 is not support SD card drive, please use v1.96 or later, the latest version is v1.99.

  • Step 1. Plug a micro SD card to the card slot, please format the SD card as FAT32.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to Espruino IDE and upload it.
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var fs = require('fs');

// Init SDCard
WioLTE.init;

// List files
console.log('List files on root path:\r\n', fs.readdirSync());
// Write file  
fs.writeFileSync("hello.txt", "Hello World");
// read file
console.log(fs.readFileSync("hello.txt"));
// append file
fs.appendFileSync("hello.txt", "!!!");
// read again
console.log(fs.readFileSync("hello.txt"));

6. Play with Grove Module

6.1. Play with Digital Ports

6.1.1 Grove-Button (Input)

  • Step 1. Conenct Grove-Button to Wio LTE D38 port.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to IDE and upload to board.
  • Step 3. We will see the "Pressed" when we press the button. Or else, we will see "Released" printed on screen.
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WioLTE.setGrovePower(true);
var button = new (require("GroveButton"))(WioLTE.D38, function(e) {
  if (e.state) console.log("Pressed");
  else console.log("Released");
});

6.1.2 Grove-Ralay (Output)

  • Step 1. Conenct Grove-Ralay to Wio LTE D38 port.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to IDE and upload to board.
  • Step 3. We will hear the Relay switch and see the "Done" printed on screen.
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WioLTE.setGrovePower(true);
var relay = new (require('GroveRelay'))(WioLTE.D38);
setInterval(function() {
  relay.off();
  relay.pulse(1000, function() {
    console.log("Done!");
});
}, 2000);

6.2. Play with Analog Ports

  • Step 1. Conenct Grove-Light Sensor to Wio LTE A4 port.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to IDE and upload to board.
  • Step 3. We will see the numbers printed on screen.
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    WioLTE.setGrovePower(true);
    var light = new (require('GroveLightSensor'))(WioLTE.A4);
    setInterval(function() {
      console.log(light.read());
    }, 500);
    

6.3. Play with UART Ports

  • Step 1. Conenct Grove-GPS to Wio LTE UART port.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to IDE and upload to board.

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WioLTE.setGrovePower(true);
Serial1.setup(9600,{tx:WioLTE.UART[1],rx:WioLTE.UART[0]});
var gps = new (require('GPS')).connect(Serial1, function(data) {
  console.log(data);
});
- Step 3. We will see time, lat, lon, satellites and altitude info printed on screen as below.
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{  "time": "09:35:02", "lat": 30.69766, "lon": 104.05367833333, "fix": 1, "satellites": 6, "altitude": 537.2 }
{  "time": "09:35:03", "lat": 30.69765166666, "lon": 104.05366166666, "fix": 1, "satellites": 6, "altitude": 537.2 }
{  "time": "09:35:04", "lat": 30.69765, "lon": 104.05363833333, "fix": 1, "satellites": 6, "altitude": 537.1 }

6.4. Play with I2C Ports

  • Step 1. Conenct Grove 3-Axis Digital Accerlerometer(±16g) to Wio LTE I2C port.
  • Step 2. Copy the code to IDE and upload to board.

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WioLTE.setGrovePower(true);
I2C1.setup({scl:WioLTE.I2C[0], sda:WioLTE.I2C[1]});
var accel = require("ADXL345").connect(I2C1,0,0);
accel.measure(true);
setInterval(function(){
  console.log(accel.read());
},2000);
- Step 3. We will see x, y and z info printed on screen as below.

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{ "x": -0.05859375, "y": -0.46484375, "z": 0.76953125 }
{ "x": -0.0546875, "y": -0.46484375, "z": 0.765625 }
{ "x": -0.0546875, "y": -0.46875, "z": 0.7578125 }
{ "x": -0.05078125, "y": -0.47265625, "z": 0.765625 }
{ "x": -0.0546875, "y": -0.46484375, "z": 0.77734375 }
{ "x": -0.0546875, "y": -0.46875, "z": 0.765625 }
{ "x": -0.0546875, "y": -0.46875, "z": 0.765625 }
{ "x": -0.05078125, "y": -0.47265625, "z": 0.765625 }

6.5 Javascript APIs

For more info, please refer to Wio_LTE_Module

  • debug(boolean, boolean) - choose debug level
  • reset(callback) - Reset LTE
  • init(callback) - Initialise LTE
  • getVersion(callback) - returns LTE firmware version
  • connect(apn, username, password, callback) - Connect to mobile network
  • getVersion(callback) - returns current version
  • getIP(callback) - Get current IP address
  • geoLocStart(period_in_milliseconds) - Start getting geolocation data
  • geoLocStop() - Stop getting geolocation data
  • geoLocGet(callback) - Get last location
  • geoLocConvert(callback(err,latlong)) - Get last location as latitude/longitude
  • board.SMS - SMS functionality with init/read/send/list/delete functions based on the [[ATSMS]] module
  • board.Call, with:
  • call(number, callback)
  • answer(callback)
  • hangup(callback)
  • handleRing(boolean) - if trie, will call any function added with board.on('RING', ...)
  • sleep(callback) - LTE modem get into sleep mode, it can save about 100mA
  • wake(callback) - LTE modem wake up from sleep mode

Resource

Tech Support

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